Eskimo dating

Artifacts from the site indicate that the Ipiutak hunted sea and land mammals, as do modern Inuit.Seals, walruses, and caribou provided the basis of their diet.Between 25,000 and 35,000 reside in Alaska, with other smaller groups in Canada, Greenland, and Siberia.The name Eskimo was given to these people by neighboring Abnaki Indians and means "eaters of raw flesh." The name they call themselves is Inuit, or "the people." Culturally and linguistically distinct from Native Americans of the lower 48 states, as well as from the Athabaskan people of Alaska, the Inuit are closely related to the Mongoloid peoples of eastern Asia.Oriented to the sea and to living with snow, the Denbigh most likely originated the snow house.Characterized by the use of flint blades, skin-covered boats, and bows and arrows, the Denbigh was transformed further east into the Dorset Tradition by about 1000 Signs of both the Denbigh and Dorset cultures have been unearthed at the well-known Ipiutak site, located near the Inuit settlement of Point Hope, approximately 125 miles north of the Arctic Circle.

Occupying lands that stretch 12,000 miles from parts of Siberia, along the Alaskan coast, across Canada, and on to Greenland, the Inuit are one of the most widely dispersed people in the world, but number only about 60,000 in population.Houses at Ipiutak were small, about 12 by 15 feet square, with sod-covered walls and roof.Benches against the walls were used for sleeping, while the fire was kept in a small central depression of the main room.However, it appears that some of the Thule backtracked, returning to set up permanent villages in both Alaska and Siberia.Anthropologically classified as central-based wanderers, the Inuit spent part of the year on the move, searching for food, and then part of the year at a central, more permanent camp.