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This childhood fantasia didn’t happen by accident: some of it is the result of urban-design investments made by Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google, and his wife, Anne Wojcicki (pronounced Wo--skee), the most important couple in town—and perhaps the most prominent young couple in Silicon Valley.

With more than billion in wealth—much of it in special B-class stock that allows Brin to retain a good share of his voting power in Google—they were ranked ninth among U. families in charitable giving last year, on their way to becoming Generation X’s answer to Bill and Melinda Gates.“Sergey is a beloved oddball of a guy, and unlike [Google’s current and former C. O.’s] Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, he’s the one who gets to do the cool stuff at Google,” says an industry observer.

Slim and attractive, Wojcicki is currently living on her own, trying to manage the children while engaged in a serious battle over saving 23and Me, which has come under fire from the U. Brin and Page filled the garage with desks made of old pine doors set on sawhorses, a turquoise shag carpet, and a Ping-Pong table.

Their search engine, initially called “Back Rub,” evaluated the incoming links on a page instead of keywords, as their competitors did, as well as the importance of the entity doing the linking.

Wojcicki’s father was the chairman of Stanford’s physics department, and her mother is a journalism teacher.

A lightly tanned brunette who was high-energy, athletic, and popular in school—a sort of Jennifer Aniston in Birkenstocks—Wojcicki figure-skated as a child and played ice hockey at Yale, where she majored in biology.

Rosenberg was a “public persona” within Google, says a co-worker, and sought a “path for attention” rather than focusing on being collegial within her department.“Glass” is the shorthand for the computerized spectacles Brin began rolling out last year. K., Glass,” the glasses leap into action, performing most of the functions of a smartphone—checking e-mail, uploading photos to social media, and, in what’s perhaps its most bizarre trick, taking videos of the world from the viewpoint of the wearer’s eyes. K., Glass” and has modeled the product at events and on social media. Couple Brin’s and Wojcicki’s orbits collided in 1998, when Brin, a graduate student in Stanford’s computer-science department, moved off campus with classmate Larry Page to set up a search-engine company in Wojcicki’s sister Susan’s garage.

Though not as high-profile as Brin, she has provided a human face—an attractive, young, female face—to Glass, much the way Scarlett Johansson’s voice, in Spike Jonze’s film is the human interface of a computer operating system so charming and sympathetic that a man falls in love with it. Rosenberg is wrestling with an even more pernicious demon: depression. Susan, who met Brin when he dated a friend of hers, charged them

This childhood fantasia didn’t happen by accident: some of it is the result of urban-design investments made by Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google, and his wife, Anne Wojcicki (pronounced Wo--skee), the most important couple in town—and perhaps the most prominent young couple in Silicon Valley.With more than $30 billion in wealth—much of it in special B-class stock that allows Brin to retain a good share of his voting power in Google—they were ranked ninth among U. families in charitable giving last year, on their way to becoming Generation X’s answer to Bill and Melinda Gates.“Sergey is a beloved oddball of a guy, and unlike [Google’s current and former C. O.’s] Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, he’s the one who gets to do the cool stuff at Google,” says an industry observer.Slim and attractive, Wojcicki is currently living on her own, trying to manage the children while engaged in a serious battle over saving 23and Me, which has come under fire from the U. Brin and Page filled the garage with desks made of old pine doors set on sawhorses, a turquoise shag carpet, and a Ping-Pong table.

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This childhood fantasia didn’t happen by accident: some of it is the result of urban-design investments made by Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google, and his wife, Anne Wojcicki (pronounced Wo--skee), the most important couple in town—and perhaps the most prominent young couple in Silicon Valley.

With more than $30 billion in wealth—much of it in special B-class stock that allows Brin to retain a good share of his voting power in Google—they were ranked ninth among U. families in charitable giving last year, on their way to becoming Generation X’s answer to Bill and Melinda Gates.“Sergey is a beloved oddball of a guy, and unlike [Google’s current and former C. O.’s] Larry Page and Eric Schmidt, he’s the one who gets to do the cool stuff at Google,” says an industry observer.

Slim and attractive, Wojcicki is currently living on her own, trying to manage the children while engaged in a serious battle over saving 23and Me, which has come under fire from the U. Brin and Page filled the garage with desks made of old pine doors set on sawhorses, a turquoise shag carpet, and a Ping-Pong table.

Their search engine, initially called “Back Rub,” evaluated the incoming links on a page instead of keywords, as their competitors did, as well as the importance of the entity doing the linking.

Wojcicki’s father was the chairman of Stanford’s physics department, and her mother is a journalism teacher.

A lightly tanned brunette who was high-energy, athletic, and popular in school—a sort of Jennifer Aniston in Birkenstocks—Wojcicki figure-skated as a child and played ice hockey at Yale, where she majored in biology.

Rosenberg was a “public persona” within Google, says a co-worker, and sought a “path for attention” rather than focusing on being collegial within her department.“Glass” is the shorthand for the computerized spectacles Brin began rolling out last year. K., Glass,” the glasses leap into action, performing most of the functions of a smartphone—checking e-mail, uploading photos to social media, and, in what’s perhaps its most bizarre trick, taking videos of the world from the viewpoint of the wearer’s eyes. K., Glass” and has modeled the product at events and on social media. Couple Brin’s and Wojcicki’s orbits collided in 1998, when Brin, a graduate student in Stanford’s computer-science department, moved off campus with classmate Larry Page to set up a search-engine company in Wojcicki’s sister Susan’s garage.

Though not as high-profile as Brin, she has provided a human face—an attractive, young, female face—to Glass, much the way Scarlett Johansson’s voice, in Spike Jonze’s film is the human interface of a computer operating system so charming and sympathetic that a man falls in love with it. Rosenberg is wrestling with an even more pernicious demon: depression. Susan, who met Brin when he dated a friend of hers, charged them $1,700 a month rent to offset her mortgage (she is now the most senior female employee at Google, and the new head of You Tube).

,700 a month rent to offset her mortgage (she is now the most senior female employee at Google, and the new head of You Tube).

The suburb of Los Altos, dotted with sequoia trees and apricot orchards, resembles most wealthy areas in Northern California’s Silicon Valley, with a main street of shops selling hyper-athletic offerings, like fleeces for hiking nearby mountains, and Francophile designs to decorate Provençal-influenced homes (sterling-silver trivets, champagne flutes imported from Paris).After graduation she worked as a health-care investment analyst on Wall Street for 10 years. “It was always embarrassing to come home,” she has said.“People were like, ‘Oh, Anne, you Wall Street girl.’ ” (Neither Brin nor Wojcicki responded to questions from )In Brin, Wojcicki found another child of baby-boomer academics who could see beyond academia’s cautious, elitist approach to discovering new knowledge, a slow process in which researchers propose a hypothesis, organize an experiment to collect data, submit findings to peer review, and finally, many months later, gain publication in an esoteric journal.A toy store is stuffed with puffy glitter stickers and neon science projects for kid geniuses.A farm-to-fork restaurant includes a nanny-staffed room for children so you can enjoy your meal in peace, and a 5,000-square-foot kids’ science center with an electromagnetic ring toss and an exhibition about the way the wind moves on the ocean opened its doors in December.